Archive | March, 2012

ADC Comic of the Day(s): HEART OF A CORPSE

23 Mar

by Orion Tippens

(Mike here – this is one of my favorite things about comics: finding a cool gem that I’ve never heard of before. Orion’s review here has convinced me to check this out – you’re going to want to, too! But there’s one thing I’m wondering: is creator Justin Sane the same guy from the band Anti-Flag, or is there more than one walking the earth?! – UPDATE: See comment from Mr. Sane below for the answer!)

Heart of a Corpse #1, #2

Writer, Artist: Justin Sane

Slave Labor Graphics 2011, complete story in two acts

#1 – 58 pages, #2 – 83 pages

Heart of a Corpse cover

Looking for something new, something wonderful in the sequential art format? Do you also desire creativity, an extended display of shapes and colors that tell the story more than words could? How about a romantic story with a spooktacular vibe?   Then do check out Heart of a Corpse.

What is this wonder? Heart of a Corpse is a simple story in a Victorian style setting about a hearse driver named “The Gentleman,” and his courting of the mortician’s daughter, Annabel. This leading to a proposal in marriage. But trouble happens, as another man, “the Brute,” wants Annabel to himself, and proceeds in nefarious acts against our romantic protagonist. Supernatural and abstract elements develop, adding to the entertaining twists that guide us to a thoughtful, beautiful ending.

Heart of a Corpse art 1

The execution of the story is beautiful, classic. Like a silent movie, we as readers must rely on basic visuals, with a few necessary placards for the entire story. The Continue reading

Going Digital: Five Crazy Ideas in Re-revolutionizing Digital Comics!

16 Mar

by Orion Tippens, ADC

Weapon X (story arc)

It's like I'm INSIDE THE COMICS! (Image of the future via Wikipedia)

Digital Comics, where are you going?

Recently, the leading digital comics multi-platform app, Comixology, achieved over 50 million downloads in single-issue comics and graphic novels. That is the good news for the comics industry, at least in knowing that many people are now exposed to the sequential-art storytelling format.

Of course, not all comics fanpeople will accept the new medium. Digital comics are all bits and bytes, with no real chance for resale of purchase and the fear that all purchases could disappear of the service permanently dies out. Those who favor the digital format will relish in the higher definition color, availability selection, and “light” reading. There have been breakthroughs to further the revolution of digital-comics reading, including the single-panel “Guided View” option, cross-platform account access with cheap digital exclusives, and free samples. Is that enough?

No, but the publishing industry is improving. As digital piracy will continue, innovation is needed to usher in this potential new digital golden era.

Marvel Comics, meanwhile, has announced its new “Marvel Infinite” imprint. Within are a few curious ideas to enhance traditional narratives including the “control the caption boxes and how they’re delivered to the reader.” Marvel also announced its new Augmented Reality system for mobile devices, where the scanning of strategically placed QR codes adds to its comics content.

However, a well-sequenced art narrative is all one needs to enjoy a comics story to its fullest. That being said, the industry should focus on innovative ways to get the readers better involved with published content. This can be done by enhancing not just the experience of reading the comic, but also getting involved with other aspects including the setting, the technology, and the invitation to new, innovative ideas.

Here, below, are my crazy ideas to ponder in the new and revolutionizing expanse of the comics-publishing biz. Interested companies, feel free to take note and steal (through credit would be nice). Ponder the possibilities. If such ideas are in the works, please point them out in the comments below. Or even better, add a few of your own.

Annotative tagging – Red Lanterns, Secret Invasions, Renegade Clonetroopers, obscure Grant Morrison characters got your head in a spin? Backtracking on such elaborate mythologies may procure in difficulty for those with empty wallets, or lacking in free time. A simple solution, especially for the new readers, would be genius. How about, for those fancy touch screens, a simple tagging system with access to some sort of large information collective on repeat characters, past events, and relevant back issues? Perhaps holding down on some returning character can pop up some information on background, abilities, favorite pie, whatever.  Does this take away or distract from the story? As long as it is optional, then no. Also, think of the other possibilities Continue reading

Before Watchmen’s non-cover on Previews

16 Mar

by Mike Hansen

Found this picture via Bleeding Cool:

Before Watchmen Previews cover

the back cover to the next issue of Previews, dropping in a couple weeks. Copyright Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons, held hostage by DC Comics, Inc.

I guess the already-leaked covers to all of the Before Watchmen comics in this catalog weren’t deemed good enough to promote this “event.”

And it’s probably safe to say that the 1-for-25 and 1-for-200 variant covers, all by other artists, haven’t been drawn and/or approved by DC yet?

I thought I’d suggest some alternate text for this cover: Continue reading

MUST-READ: massive Alan Moore interview on Before Watchmen and much more (with COMMENTARY)

13 Mar

by Mike Hansen

Cover art for the 1987 U.S. (right) and U.K. (...

One of the best books you'll ever read. (Image via Wikipedia)

DUDE. A few comics sites and fan boards are already quoting from this, but it really has to be read in full.

Drop everything and CLICK HERE NOW.

Alan Moore has the balls to stick to his guns and tell the truth as he sees it about comics. A lot of fanboys and professionals (who are mostly fanboys) are going to hate him for this, but I loooooove it. Personally, I agree with a lot of what he says. Not all, but so what? He’s got my respect for telling it like he sees it. (And even if he was batshit crazy and spitting nonsense, like some clueless folks try to suggest, his work changed EVERYTHING, and that speaks for itself. Respect is due)

A few important bits, to get you to click over if you haven’t already:

…Yes, I still get a little bit of the money that I consider myself to be owed for these things.  But, it’s not really the money that’s the principle.  It’s the fact that I was lied to.  It’s the fact that the reason they offered us Watchmen was that they’d seen what I could do with their regular comics.  They could see that I was capable of moving them to a new area that comics had not ventured into before.  So, they offered us Watchmen and it worked out very, very well for them.  They were able to suddenly claim that all of their comics were “graphic novels” now–that they were seriously committed to a progressive comics medium that could produce works of art and literature.  But, that is never what they were concerned with.  It was always purely to do with commerce.

Man, the number of actual “graphic novels” that DC has published since Watchmen is probably less than 5% of its total output. It’s almost all serialized, unending bits of stories strung together. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, if it’s done right.

But, I resolved that I didn’t want to work for DC Comics ever again–or their subsidiaries.  This worked fine for a number of years until Continue reading

Ghost Rider 2-for-1 post: Gary Friedrich appeals, and I watched Spirit of Vengeance

13 Mar

by Mike Hansen

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance

Image via Wikipedia

Blogger Daniel Best has reported that Gary Friedrich has appealed the court decision against him and his LLC regarding his claims to Marvel’s Ghost Rider as its creator (or co-creator). I’m surprised this hasn’t been mentioned elsewhere yet – if the court is willing to hear the appeal, this could have real consequences for creators who worked under the pre-Work For Hire copyright system. Regardless of how it plays out, the $17,000 judgment against Friedrich is cruel and inhumane – there’s no reason that a reasonable settlement couldn’t have been worked out.

Disney/Marvel trotted out a couple of its big guns to try to make the company look like less of a Giant Dick. Joe Quesada gets big props from me for putting the Hero Initiative in touch with Friedrich – I hope his precarious financial situation regarding his health and home gets a happy ending. Mad props go out to everyone who donated money or participated in charity auctions on Friedrich’s behalf.

The Hero Intitiative

Donate: it's a good cause! (Image via Wikipedia)

Friedrich is just one of dozens of writers and artists who worked for Marvel during the pre-contract, pre-Work For Hire era who have seen the work for which they built the foundation turned into money-making machinery for which they receive little (if any) compensation. Creators have been getting screwed Continue reading

Friday Reading: A rare 1967 Jack Kirby story from Esquire

9 Mar

by Mike Hansen

King Kirby

'Nuff said, True Believer.

This has been on the internet before, but the best-looking color scan yet of Jack Kirby’s 3-page story “46 Hours and 36 Minutes in the Life of Jack Ruby” (from the May 1967 issue of Esquire) appeared recently on the Marvel Masterworks Fan Site message board. User Famac “destroyed” his copy of this magazine so the story could be shared with the world. (Jack Ruby, as you may know, shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald.)

Kirby worked in a variety of genres, though by the 1960s he was best known for his unparalleled creation of the foundation of the Marvel Universe (Fantastic Four, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, Ant-Man, the Avengers, X-Men, etc.). This is a rare “true-life” story from Kirby’s body of work. The story (inked by Chic Stone) has been reprinted only once – in black-and-white, in The Jack Kirby Collector #2 from 1994.

Here’s page 1 – click here for the whole thing, and have a great weekend!

Kirby Esquire 1 Continue reading

Tracers need to watch their asses

9 Mar

by Mike Hansen

The Beat linked to this big-ass thread about Invincible Iron Man artist Salvador Larroca being the latest high-profile talent to be caught swiping.

Salvador Larroca swipe

Part of this is copyright Marvel, part is copyright the photographer, or AP, or somebody. None of this is used with permission. Uh-oh.

Is this stealing, or a fair re-interpretation of another’s work? Well…

After Mike Mayhew, David Mack, and Greg Land (among others) got caught swiping, Marvel updated its contracts to say that the artists assert that their work is wholly original (as a way to cover Marvel’s ass).

The Associated Press definitely does NOT have a sense of humor about this; it’s pursued legal action against news aggregator sites and blogs that quote from its articles.

And ALL comics artists need to be paying attention to what’s happening to Shepard Fairey, who might face JAIL TIME for Continue reading

Interview with AXE COP artist Ethan Nicolle!

7 Mar

UPDATE: Welcome, all of you Axe Cop fans! Since so many of you are new to this site, I just want to say Welcome, and if you like the site feel free to Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @AllDayComics – thanks for stopping by!

(Mike here – this interview was conducted WAY back on October 29 at the Long Beach Comic and Horror Convention. Due to various difficulties, it’s just getting posted now. We thought it was still worth posting because – it’s AXE COP, so it’s awesome! – and Volume 3 is coming out soon (click the preorder link below the interview). Hope you like…)

Axe Cop artist Ethan Nicolle at his booth (photo by Orion Tippens)

Axe Cop artist Ethan Nicolle at his booth (photo by Orion Tippens)

Interview by Orion Tippens

I love Axe Cop, so much, that I have considered naming my firstborn, Axe Cop. That is how much I love Axe Cop.

And if you have not, perhaps you should visit axecop.com and understand the joys of this brilliant webcomic. Or even better, check out the first trade paperback Axe Cop: Volume 1 collection published via Dark Horse Comics, all the early strips with Ethan’s fun commentary added on the side.

Axe Cop, in short, is the brilliant product of a five-year-old’s (now seven) imaginative mind (Malachai Nicolle), brought to life by the sequential art of his 29-year-old brother (Ethan Nicolle). We meet a superhero with powerful sock arms, a flying dinosaur with gatling arms, an optic blastic dog, ninjas on the moon, a man-baby, a uni-baby, and so much more.  We as readers who enjoy such work, and laugh, love this fresh and ever-changing world centered around our awesome protagonist. He, who is Axe Cop, the mustached, axe-wielding lawman of justice with secret attacks, and well defined (and often lethal) style of fighting evil.

So imagine my delight, when I had the chance to personally meet the artist of Axe Cop, Ethan Nicolle, at the Long Beach Comic Con in Los Angeles. Ethan was alone, promoting Axe Cop and his newest self-published work, Bearmageddon. Malachai was elsewhere, tending to a book signing. Here, from the show’s artist alley section, is a transcript of a wonderful yet brief interview:

ALL DAY COMICS: Hello, Ethan Nicolle.

ETHAN NICOLLE: Hello.

(During this point, there was a nearby live Star Wars live roleplaying event going on, so please if you will..imagine the Star Wars: Episode I Duel of the Fates music track playing in the background)

ADC: With Malachai’s schooling and state of adolescence, the creative process must be unconventional, perhaps challenging in the production of Axe Cop. In working with Malachai, where and how often do you meet in planning new material?

Continue reading

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